The CIA  has spied on intellectual dissident Noam Chomsky since the 1960’s, screamed the headlines of El Telegrafo, a newspaper from Ecuador, August 13, 2013

Wonder if the Washington Post, once the main player in spy operation Operation Mockingbird (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Mockingbird), recently purchased by billionaire Jeff Bezo, reported this?  How about the New York Times?  Doubtful.  They won’t even report on Chomsky

The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) U.S. has admitted that it spied on linguistics professor from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the voice of dissent against Washington, Noam Chomsky, published yesterday in the journal Foreign Policy (http://www.telegrafo.com.ec/mundo/item/la-cia-espio-a-noam-chomsky-desde-los-60.html).

A cable requested through the Freedom of Information Act FOIA by attorney Kel McClanahan, executive director of National Security Counselors, shows that although the CIA repeatedly denied it had a file on the work of Chomsky, an intellectual, very critical of the White House since the 60s, they lied.

The CIA document, dated on June 8, 1970, discusses the activities in protest against the Vietnam War by Chomsky and requests information from the FBI about a journey of American intellectuals to North Vietnam, the Communist side in the conflict led by Ho Chi Minh.

The memorandum indicates that Chomsky supported the trip and asked for information about related persons on that trip.

The CIA had refused previous requests for information under the FOIA, designed to improve the transparency of the federal state of the US, arguing that it had found no records of Chomsky in CIA files.

Due to the history of the espionage organization know in Latin America as “La CIA” in spying on opposition figures opposed to the Vietnam War, since 1975 few believed the excuses of the intelligence agency, stating they had no records, on Chomsky.

Chomsky, considered one of the most important contemporary thinkers, said he was not surprised by the revelation, which comes at a time of great turmoil for the programs spy secrets leaked by ex-analyst Edward Snowden in June by the National Security Agency,.

“Someday they will realize that the power systems seek to expand in everything you can think of,” said Chomsky.
Foreign Policy points out that under the Federal Records Act of 1950, the law requires that all Federal agencies must obtain prior approval before destroying documents and Chomsky would be one person that this would apply to.

A note from June 8, 1970 discusses Chomsky activities and requests the FBI get more information about his activities.  In any case, the fact that the CIA has removed or better yet destroyed these files raises a more disturbing question: the record of who else has ‘evaporated’ or what other chapters in the history of the CIA rest in the shade.

“It’s important to know that the CIA decided to destroy the file Chomsky and why” write scholars who argue that without a doubt, Chomsky was not the only CIA evaporated file. “How many more disappeared?”, they ask (http://www.telegrafo.com.ec/mundo/item/la-cia-espio-a-noam-chomsky-desde-los-60.html).

In June of this year Chomsky delivered on of his best speeches on the hypocrisy and danger of US foreign policy.  See the Youtube at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmDrHRfo2SE