Online Degrees Are a Waste of Money!!

On-line degrees are not only a waste of money, but they fail to provide any meaningful learning.  While they are boasted to be about ‘getting a degree’ at one’s own leisure and isolated in the privacy of their own homes, the truth of the matter is far different. Below is one of the most honest […]

The federal government is violating the First Amendment and the Separation of Powers under the False Claims Act: the role of the neo-liberal state apparatus in aiding and abetting corporate America

Readers hopefully have read the article by whistle blower, David Goodstein, entitled “So you want to blow your whistle: Confessions of a whistle blower (http://dailycensored.com/2010/12/06/so-you-want-to-blow-your-whistle-confessions-of-a-whistle-blower/).  David Goodstein is the courageous whistleblower who came forward to denounce the sordid practices of for-profit predatory college, Kaplan University.  Mr. Goodstein filed a legal case against Kaplan through the […]

Charter schools and the road to private school vouchers

Charter Schools:  It’s all about market share and yes, vouchers Remember the ‘voucher’ movement?  I do, I wrote a book on it some ten years ago as it swept the nation as rightwing bad breath has a tendency to do.  “Choice” then, as now, was the favorite word of the sophists that tried to sell […]

A Public-Private Partnership? What is the economic relationship between EMOs and traditional public schools and/or charter schools?

In fact, the use of the term ‘partnership’ is the real key to understanding the way EMOs have framed the issue for the public, insofar as the term implies a mutual playing ground between parties in the contract. According to Jonathan Kozol, educational writer and best selling author: One of the early strategies employed by private corporations to soften resistance to their presence in our public schools was the creation of so-called business partnerships between the poorest inner-city schools and large companies. The financial side of the partnership usually turned out to be inconsequential. Kerr-McGee, the multinational petrochemical giant, gave one impoverished public school in Oklahoma City the trivial annual sum of $36 for each pupil. In return, one of the company’s executives was appointed to direct a “governance committee” to oversee the school operations, and the school consented to be known not simply as a public elementary school but as an “Enterprise School”.