India Adopts No Child Left Behind Agenda

By Guest Blogger George Thompson It seems almost sacrilege to question the Globe and Mail’s recent proclamation that “With a sweeping school law, India secures its future: The superpower-in-waiting makes childhood education compulsory for the first time.”  But while there can be no denial that the recent laws for education reforms of India are desirable (ie. […]

Accountability Office Investigates Itself but Hides Report

By Guest Blogger George Thomson, The vanishing of a conflict of interest case in Ontario’s education system is a sign of the extent to which the province has committed to importing the public-private partnership model and the extent to which such conflicts are now accepted as the natural side-effect of the new way of doing […]

Canadian Council on Learning to be Replaced by More Business Focused Think-Tank

By guest blogger George Thompson The Canadian Council on Learning (CCL) has provided precisely the kind of alignment desired by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, a globalization think-tank which is responsible for the “raise the bar” and “close the gap” propaganda used to pressure governments into the public-private “partnership” model in most of […]

A Public-Private Partnership? What is the economic relationship between EMOs and traditional public schools and/or charter schools?

In fact, the use of the term ‘partnership’ is the real key to understanding the way EMOs have framed the issue for the public, insofar as the term implies a mutual playing ground between parties in the contract. According to Jonathan Kozol, educational writer and best selling author: One of the early strategies employed by private corporations to soften resistance to their presence in our public schools was the creation of so-called business partnerships between the poorest inner-city schools and large companies. The financial side of the partnership usually turned out to be inconsequential. Kerr-McGee, the multinational petrochemical giant, gave one impoverished public school in Oklahoma City the trivial annual sum of $36 for each pupil. In return, one of the company’s executives was appointed to direct a “governance committee” to oversee the school operations, and the school consented to be known not simply as a public elementary school but as an “Enterprise School”.