Injustice in Palestine: The Palestine Papers

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/your-world-news/2011/02/01/injustice-in-palestine-the-palestine-papers This episode features an exclusive interview with Kathleen Christison who will be deconstructing the recent release of the Palestine Papers and the damning revelations they reveal regarding everything from the US, Israel, and the Palestinian Authority, and their relationship to the ongoing struggle of Palestine’s quest for self-determination and true independence from Israel oppression. […]

The privatization of education, the colonization of subjectivity

On June 2nd I was notified that an article I wrote, Neoliberalism, Charter Schools and the Chicago Model / Obama and Duncan’s Education Policy: Like Bush’s, Only Worse published by Counterpunch, August 24, 2009, had been selected for the Project Censored “Most Censored” News Stories of 2009-10 Awards.  This was both a surprise and an honor. […]

A Public-Private Partnership? What is the economic relationship between EMOs and traditional public schools and/or charter schools?

In fact, the use of the term ‘partnership’ is the real key to understanding the way EMOs have framed the issue for the public, insofar as the term implies a mutual playing ground between parties in the contract. According to Jonathan Kozol, educational writer and best selling author: One of the early strategies employed by private corporations to soften resistance to their presence in our public schools was the creation of so-called business partnerships between the poorest inner-city schools and large companies. The financial side of the partnership usually turned out to be inconsequential. Kerr-McGee, the multinational petrochemical giant, gave one impoverished public school in Oklahoma City the trivial annual sum of $36 for each pupil. In return, one of the company’s executives was appointed to direct a “governance committee” to oversee the school operations, and the school consented to be known not simply as a public elementary school but as an “Enterprise School”.