As the days go by, the plot over the plight of Edward Snowden, the whistleblower who once worked for the CIA and Booz Allen Hamilton (a private intelligence contractor) heated up (http://www.dailycensored.com/booz-allen-hamilton-helping-the-government-insure-domestic-tranquility/).

The London Guardian has reported that after a plane carrying the Bolivian president, Evo Morales was flying home from Russia it was diverted to Vienna amid suspicions that it was carrying Edward Snowden.  France and Portugal refused the jet entry into their airspace. The plane was forced to land in Vienna, but there were no signs of Snowden.

Evo Morales’s jet was returning with the president on board from energy talks in Moscow, when France and Portugal refused it to pass through their airspace (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jul/03/edward-snowden-bolivia-plane-vienna?CMP=EMCNEWEML6619I2).

It seems that France and Portugal cancelled authorization for the Bolivian president’s flight while Spain’s government allowed the plane to be refueled in its territory. From there the plane flew on to Vienna.

Officials in both Austria and Bolivia said Snowden was not on the plane. Meanwhile, the Bolivian foreign minister, David Choquehuanca, said in a statement:

“We don’t know who invented this lie. We want to denounce to the international community this injustice with the plane of President Evo Morales” (ibid).

In what can only be seen as an orchestrated attempt by the US to illegally interfere in Bolivia’s affairs, Italy and Spain were said to also be denying the plane carrying Morales permission to fly through their airspace.

France and Portugal later reconsidered and agreed to allow Morales’ plane to fly over in their airspace, but Italy and Spain were still refusing as of this report (ibid).

Morales and his party, which was part of the Defense Minister Ruben Saavedra, left toward the Spanish archipelago of the Canary Islands in the Atlantic Ocean, to make a stopover here on his way to La Paz (http://www.telegrafo.com.ec/actualidad/item/evo-morales-partio-desde-austria-tras-el-bloqueo-de-su-vuelo.html).

Bolivia Defense Minister Ruben Saavedra, told the Guardian:

“This is a hostile act by the United States State Department which has used various European governments” (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jul/03/edward-snowden-bolivia-plane-vienna?CMP=EMCNEWEML6619I2).

Officials at the White House refused to comment on whether it had put pressure on western European allies to refuse to allow the plane to enter their airspace.  However, one can certainly conclude that this was the case for Morales had earlier used a television interview in Moscow to hint strongly that Bolivia would look favorably on an asylum request from Snowden.  Speaking in Moscow, Morales said Bolivia had not received a formal application for asylum from Snowden yet, but hinted it would consider any request favorably.

Morales told RT Actualidad, the Spanish-language service of Russian broadcaster RT.

“If there were a request, of course we would be willing to debate and consider the idea.  I know that the empires have an espionage network and are against the so-called developing countries. And in particular, against those which are rich in natural resources” (ibid).

As of the publishing of the Guardian report, officials at Portugal’s foreign ministry and National Civil Aviation Authority could not be reached for comment.  French government officials reached overnight said they could not confirm whether Morales’ plane was denied permission to fly over France.

Morales is not alone in his support for Snowden.  Venezuelan President, Nicolás Maduro, said Caracas was also ready to consider Snowden’s asylum should he ask for it. Maduro said Snowden should be given a “humanitarian medal” for revealing details of NSA surveillance programs on US and foreign citizens:

“He did not kill anyone and did not plant a bomb.  What he did was tell a great truth in an effort to prevent wars. He deserves protection under international and humanitarian law” (ibid).

The Union of South American Nations holds special meeting over the affair

Ali Rodriguez, secretary general of the Union of South American Nations (UNASUR), said the agency will hold a special meeting to discuss the situation created by the denial of access to airspace for several European countries in the plane carrying President of Bolivia Evo Morales. The date of the meeting, to be pinpointed at the request of the Government of Ecuador, and will be determined by the presidents of the member countries of the organism.

The Secretary General of Unasur called it “outrageous” that the impediments have been placed Morales aircraft flyby. “That cannot be allowed to be the norm; it would be a way to passively accept imperial exercise in countries where much blood spilled to achieve independence” (http://www.telegrafo.com.ec/actualidad/item/evo-morales-partio-desde-austria-tras-el-bloqueo-de-su-vuelo.html).

He went on to note:

“Those affected by the revelations of Snowden are European countries, mainly France. Instead of reacting against this, they absurdly reacted against the president of a sovereign country, such as President of Bolivia” (ibid).

The Organization of American States calls for explanations

The secretary general of the Organization of American States (OAS), José Miguel Insulza, said that European countries needed to provide explanations regarding their actions that put “at risk” the life of Morales.

In a statement, Insulza expressed his “profound displeasure with the decision of the authorities in several European countries.

According to Insulza:

“nothing justifies an action as disrespectful to the highest authority of a country” (ibid).

Secretary General of the Andean Community of Nations (CAN), Pablo Guzman, re-echoed the sentiment, stating:

“there is nothing to justify an attitude of that nature,” and said that the actions of the European countries involved: “not only has violated the rights of air traffic safety but President “Morales (ibid).

Summary

It is clear that the United States is not only illegally interfering with Bolivia’s right to occupy airspace but also Latin America, which they consider their backyard.  Furthermore, the US is bent on assuring that Snowden is not allowed safe passage out of Russia.  Putting the life of Evo Morales in jeopardy by not allowing his flight across Europe has the potential to backfire for citizens in Europe are now aware that the CIA and its surrogates were also spying on European diplomats (http://www.salon.com/2013/07/01/report_nsa_spied_on_european_diplomats_partner/).  Add to this the fact that Latin America is on the rise, bodes badly for the US military industrial complex and the failin US Empire.

The sad tale of intrigue and imperialist pretentions continues with no end in sight.