For-profit colleges-such as The Art Institutes, Argosy University, Brown Mackie College, and South University-generate millions in profits for Wall Street.
 
Meanwhile students get the short end of the stick. Typically at for-profit schools, tuition is higher, debt is larger, and graduation rates are lower than at traditional schools.
 
That’s why the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) is sponsoring “Good for Wall Street—Bad for Students,” a panel discussion and national webcast on the dangers of for-profit colleges—especially the 105 schools owned and operated by Pittsburgh-based Education Management Corporation (EDMC).
 
Please join us online on Thursday, Feb. 2, from 12 noon until 2 p.m. (Eastern) at www.ForProfitU.org/webinar
 
“It’s time to get the word out about these for-profit colleges,” says Mike DiGiacomo, a former student of EDMC’s New England Institute of Art in Boston. “They’re hurting far too many people.”
 
DiGiacomo is one of eight participants on the panel, which also includes education policy experts and professionals who have worked at EDMC schools in recruiting, teaching, and job placement. After a brief overview of the for-profit college industry, the panel will examine every phase of the for-profit student experience—recruitment often followed by high costs, poor instruction, weak job-placement programs, excessive debt loads, and default on loans.
 
Whether you are new to this issue or you know all about the business practices of for-profit schools, you are sure to learn something new from this all-star panel, which includes:
 
Kevin Kinser, Associate Professor in the Dept. of Educational Administration and Policy Studies, SUNY-Albany
Barmak Nassirian, Associate Executive Director, American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers
José Cruz, Vice President for Higher Education Policy and Practice, The Education Trust
Osamudia R. James, Associate Professor of Law, University of Miami School of Law
Kathleen Bittel, former EDMC recruiter and career services employee
Jeremy Dehn, former EDMC instructor
Suzanne Lawrence, former EDMC recruiter
Mike DiGiacomo, former student at EDMC’s New England Institute of Art
 
Again, please join us on February 2, from 12 noon until 2 p.m. (Eastern) at www.ForProfitU.org/webinar
 
And please forward this e-mail to others who may be interested in learning more about the dangers of for-profit colleges.
 
For more information, visit www.ForProfitU.org
 
On behalf of our wonderful panelists, thank you