CENSORED IN 1993:

HOW TO SELL POLLUTION FOR PROFIT

In early May, 1992, the Wisconsin Power and Light Company sold “pollution credits” to the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for about $3 million. In effect, this deal gave TVA permission to spew into the air an additional 10,000 tons of sulfur dioxide, the primary source of acid rain.

The sale, the first to be implemented under the pollution credit trading system, authorized by the misnamed 1990 “Clean Air Act,” was hyped by the media as an example of using market forces to control pollution. Outside of environmental groups, few questioned the dangerous precedent set by this deal.

The act sets ceilings on the amount of sulfur that polluters will be allowed to emit after 1995, then, incredibly, if a plant reduced its emissions more than required, it can sell its “extra” emission reductions to another plant that fails to reduce its emissions to the required level.

Critics say the pollution credit program is based on the fundamentally flawed premise that a certain level of pollution is acceptable. “Clean air should be protected, not traded and sold like a used car,” says Chris Blythe of Wisconsin’s Citizens Utility Board.

The Multinational Monitor, June 1992, was a source for the story which was named the #21 censored story of 1993.

 

REPORTED IN 2010

EPA: CLEAN-AIR RULE REVERSES BUSH-ERA PLAN

The Associated Press reported on July 7, 2010, that “The Obama administration is proposing a new rule to tighten restrictions on pollution from coal burning power plants in the eastern half of the country, a key step to cut emissions that cause smog.

“The Environmental Protection Agency said Tuesday the new rule represented its most consequential effort yet to tackle deadly pollution that contributes to smog and soot that hangs over more than half the country.”

 

 

Those who cannot remember the past

are condemned to repeat it!

-George Santayana