CENSORED IN 1989:

SOMETHING FOUL IN THE CHICKEN INDUSTRY

      The number of cases of salmonella has risen to 2.5 million a year and led to an estimated 500,000 hospitalizations and 9,000 deaths. This national epidemic was caused by a massive leap in consumer demand for the “healthier food” of chicken and by a massive failure of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

      While the chicken industry has grown to a $16-billion-a-year industry, the USDA has cut its inspection staff, lowered health standards, and cracked down on employees who try to inform the public about contaminated food.

      The relaxed inspection practices – known as the Streamlined Inspection System – are literally maiming workers and killing consumers. The rate of injury and illness for workers in poultry processing plants is twice that of textile or tobacco workers and even higher than miners.

      In 1906, Upton Sinclair shocked the public with his vivid description of the Chicago meatpacking industry in his book, “The Jungle.” The slaughtering practices in the poultry industry today are remarkably similar. It is time the mass media blew the whistle on the USDA and the poultry industry.

      The foul practices in the poultry industry and the USDA were revealed in the Southern Exposure magazine in its summer of 1989 issue. It was named the #10 best censored story of 1989.

     

 REPORTED IN 2009:

STUDY: POULTRY NO. 1

IN FOOD POISONING IN U.S.

      More than a century after Upton Sinclair exposed the filthy and hazardous practices in the meat packing industry, The New York Times caught up with the story. The Times story, which appeared June 12, 2009, was headlined:

         STUDY: POULTRY NO. 1 IN

        FOOD POISONING IN U.S.

      “Poultry was the most commonly identified source of food poisoning in the United States in 2006, followed by leafy vegetables and fruits and nuts, according to a report released Thursday by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

      “The report is the first by federal researchers to identify how most Americans become sickened by contaminated foods.”

      While the Times pointed out that a campaign by the Agriculture Department has improved the safety of poultry, it warned that the problems persist. “Most of the poultry related illnesses were associated with Clostridium perfringens, a bacterium that commonly causes abdominal cramping and diarrhea within 10 to 12 hours after ingestion.”

 

                          Those who cannot remember the past

are condemned to repeat it!

— George Santayana