CENSORED IN 1980:

SOMETHING ROTTEN IN THE GLOBAL SUPERMARKET

While modern technology has increased worldwide food production and raised per capita income, millions of landless peasants in Third World countries face starvation and malnutrition.

Prime agricultural lands in Third World countries have increasingly been converted to the production of cash export crops by vast transnational agribusiness firms. While this succeeded in increasing exports and ameliorated balance of payments problems for underdeveloped countries, the benefits have not accrued to everyone.

Multinational corporations increased their profits, taking advantage of cheap labor resources abroad. Foreign governments and the landed few also benefited from the arrangements.

But peasant farmers were driven from their subsistence lands when the multinationals arrived. New technology production did not offer enough employment opportunities to compensate for the massive displacements. Those who managed to find seasonal work in agribusiness were not paid enough to cover their subsistence food needs.

Vast migrations of hungry peasants fled to the cities where employment opportunities were not much better. The specter of urban poverty, filth, and slums proliferated.

This story which appeared in The Nation, Feb. 9, 1980, and was named the #5 censored story of 1980.

 

REPORTED IN 2010

LOWER FOOD COSTS EASE GLOBAL HUNGER

The Associated Press reported on September 15, 2010, that “The number of people going hungry in the world dropped for the first time in 15 years partly because of a recession-fueled drop in food prices, the United Nations said Tuesday.

“An estimated 925 million people worldwide are undernourished, down from just more than 1 billion in 2009.”

 

Those who cannot remember the past

are condemned to repeat it!

-George Santayana